Former Faculty

The following instructors taught Methods School courses in previous years. Without their help and dedication, the Methods School would not have become the leading regional methods program in the Asia-Pacific and a permanent, first-tier fixture on the international methods training calendar.


Bentley B. Allan

Course: Constructing an Intersubjective National Identity Data Base (2013)

Bentley B. Allan (picture) is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University. He is a graduate of the University of Toronto and earned his PhD at Ohio State University. His work combines historical discourse analysis and institutionalist theory and focuses on international relations and global governance, global environmental politics, and qualitative methods. He is is currently writing a book on the history of scientific ideas in international politics and working on a series of articles rethinking the role of scientific knowledge in global economic and environmental governance. He has previously taught interpretivist methods at the Institute of Qualitative and Multi-Method Research at Syracuse University.


Derek Beach

Course: Case Study Analysis (2012)

Derek Beach (picture) is Associate Professor of Political Science at Aarhus University, Denmark. He is a graduate of the London School of Economics and the University of Aarhus and earned his PhD at the University of Southern Denmark. He is the author of Explaining Foreign Policy (2012) and The Dynamics of European Integration: When and Why EU Institutions Matter (2005) and co-author of Process Tracing: Foundations and Guidelines (2013). In addition to qualitative research methods, his research focuses on the European Union, and he has published numerous articles on the dynamics of the European integration process in the Journal of European Public Policy. He has previously taught at the IPSA Summer School in São Paulo and the ECPR Summer School in Ljubljana and Winter School in Vienna.


Dirk Berg-Schlosser

Course: Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) (2015, 2014, 2013)

Dirk Berg-Schlosser (picture) is Professor of Political Science at the Philipps University of Marburg, Germany. He graduated from the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, where he also earned a PhD. He has another PhD from the University of California. He is former Vice President of the International Political Science Association and Chair of the European Consortium for Political Research. His latest book is Mixed Methods in Comparative Politics. Principles and Applications (2012), and he recently co-edited the International Encyclopedia of Political Science (2011). He is also author and co-author of countless articles and books on research methods, democracy and democratization, development, and political culture, among them a German textbook on QCA and related comparative methods (2011), Democratization. The State of the Art (2007), and Poverty and Development (2003). He has previously taught at the Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis, the ECPR Summer School in Methods and Techniques at the University of Ljubljana, and the IPSA Summer Schools in Ankara, São Paulo, and Stellenbosch.


Terrell Carver

Course: Discourse and Visual Analysis (2016, 2015, 2014, 2013)

Terrell F. Carver (picture) is Professor of Political Theory in the School of Sociology, Politics, and International Studies at the University of Bristol. He is a graduate of Columbia University and earned his PhD at the University of Oxford. He is a member of the executive committees of the Political Studies Association and International Political Science Association and co-editor of Contemporary Political Theory. His research focuses on Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, and Marxism as well as masculinity in international relations. He is the author of The Postmodern Marx (1998), co-author of Judith Butler and Political Theory: Troubling Politics (2008), and editor of Political Language and Metaphor: Interpreting and Changing the World (2008). In addition, he has published extensively on the linguistic turn and social science research methods in such academic journals as the British Journal of Politics and International Relations, Global Society, International Studies Review, and Millennium.


Ted Hopf

Course: Constructing an Intersubjective National Identity Data Base (2013)

Ted Hopf (picture) is Professor of Political Science at the National University of Singapore. He is a graduate of Princeton University and earned his PhD at Columbia University. His main fields of interest are qualitative research methods, international relations theory, and identity. He is the author of Reconstructing the Cold War. The Early Years, 1945-1958 (2012) and Social Construction of International Politics. Identities and Foreign Policies, Moscow, 1955 and 1999 (2002), and his work on interpretivism, discourse analysis, ethnography, and identity has been published in such leading academic journals as the American Political Science Review, International Organization, and European Journal of International Relations. He has regularly taught qualitative methods at the Institute of Qualitative and Multi-Method Research as well as the University of Michigan, Ohio University, and Ohio State University.


Simon Jackman

Course: Bayesian Analysis (2015)

Simon Jackman (picture) is Professor of Political Science and Statistics at Stanford University. He is a graduate of the University of Queensland and earned his PhD at the University of Rochester. He is associate editor of Political Analysis, principle investigator of the American National Election Studies (ANES), and former President of the Society for Political Methodology. He authored Bayesian Analysis for the Social Sciences (2009) and has published widely on public opinion, political parties, election campaigns, political participation, and electoral systems in such leading academic journals as the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Electoral Studies, and Journal of Politics. In addition to research, he consults such diverse clients as Facebook, the Huffington Post, and the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC). He has previously taught Bayesian analysis and related methods courses at the University of Oxford, University of Sydney, University of Toronto, Texas A&M University, the Juan March Institute, as well as the EITM Summer Institute at Washington University in St. Louis, the Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis, and the IPSA Summer School at the University of São Paulo.


Rebecca B. Morton

Course: Experimental Methods (2014, 2013, 2012)

Rebecca B. Morton (picture) is Professor of Politics at New York University. She is a graduate of Louisiana State University and earned her PhD at Tulane University. She is the author of Analyzing Elections (2006) and Methods and Models. A Guide to the Empirical Analysis of Formal Models in Political Science (1999), co-author of Learning by Voting. Sequential Choices in Presidential Primaries and Other Elections (2001) and Experimental Political Science and the Study of Causality. From Nature to the Lab (2010), as well as co-editor of Experimental Political Science: Principles and Practices (2012). In addition to experimental methods, here interests include the study of elections and electoral processes, the empirical analysis of formal models, and research on personality traits and ideology. She has previously taught at the IPSA Summer School at the University of São Paulo, the ECPR Summer School in Methods and Techniques at the University of Ljubljana, the Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis, and the EITM Institute.


Katrin Niglas

Course: Mixed Methods (2012)

Katrin Niglas (picture) is Professor of Informatics and Vice-Rector for Research at Tallinn University, Estonia. She graduated from the Tallinn Pedagogical University, where he also earned his PhD. She is an Editorial Board Member of the Journal of Mixed Methods Research and the International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches. In addition to her interest in data analysis and the advancement of mixed research methods, she studies social and cultural attitudes and values and has published extensively in the areas of education, e-learning, and pedagogy. She has previously taught at the ECPR Summer School in Methods and Techniques at the University of Ljubljana.


Peter Rosendorff

Course: Game Theory (2013)

Peter Rosendorff (picture) is Professor of Politics at New York University. He is a graduate of the University of the Witwatersrand and earned his PhD at Columbia University. He is the Editor of Economics and Politics and an Editorial Board Member of International Organization. His research examines primarily the linkages between domestic politics and international economic policy in the areas of trade and investment, but he is also interested in human rights, democracy and democratization, and transnational terrorism. He has published widely in leading economics, political science, and international relations journals. In addition to research, he consults such diverse clients as the World Bank, the international soccer association FIFA, and the telecommunications corporation AT&T. He has previously taught at the IPSA Summer School at the University of São Paulo.


Randy T. Stevenson

Course: Categorical Data Analysis (2016)

Randy Stevenson (picture) is Professor of Political Science at Rice University in Houston, Texas. He graduated from Texas A&M University and received both his MA and PhD from the University of Rochester. He is the co-author of The Economic Vote: How Political and Economic Institutions Condition Election Results (2008), which won the American Political Science Association's Luebbert Award for Best Book in Comparative Politics. His research focuses on political behavior, comparative political economy, the design of democratic institutions, and methodology. It has been published in such leading academic journals as the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, British Journal of Political Science, Political Analysis, and Public Choice and repeatedly been funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation. In addition to teaching the graduate statistics sequence in the Department of Political Science at Rice University, he has previously taught how to analyze categorical data at the Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis and the IPSA Summer School at the University of São Paulo.


Shawn Treier

Course: Bayesian Analysis (2016)

Shawn Treier (picture) is Lecturer of Politics and International Relations at the Australian National University and affiliated with the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney. He is a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University and received a MA in economics as well as his PhD in political science from Stanford University. In addition to his work on Bayesian measurement models, he is interested in political behavior and public opinion with a special focus on American political institutions and political development. His research has won him the American Political Science Association's Gregory Luebbert Award (2010) for best article in comparative politics, and he has been widely published in such leading academic journals as the American Journal of Political Science, Public Opinion Quarterly, American Politics Research, Journal of Politics, Journal of Law and Courts, Legislative Studies Quarterly, and Political Analysis. He has previously taught Bayesian analysis and related advanced research methods courses at the University of Virginia, University of Minnesota, University of Georgia, the Social Science Methods, Analysis, and Research Training (SSMART) workshop at the University of Sydney, as well as the Institute for Political Methodology at National Chengchi University and Academia Sinica.


Guy D. Whitten

Course: Regression Analysis (2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012)

Guy D. Whitten (picture) is Professor of Political Science and Director of the European Union Centre and the Program in Scientific Political Methodology at Texas A&M University. He graduated from the University of Rochester, where he also earned his PhD. He is co-author of The Fundamentals of Political Science Research (2013) and co-editor of the Cambridge University Press Methodological Tools in the Social Sciences book series. His research interests include political economy, comparative politics, and political methodology. His work has been published in such leading academic journals as Journal of Politics, American Journal of Political Science, British Journal of Political Science, and Political Behavior. He has previously taught at the ICPSR Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of Social Research, the Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis, and the IPSA Summer School at the University of São Paulo.

 

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